Top 8 Common Mistakes of Flyer Owners

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Top 8 Common Mistakes of Flyer Owners

Postby Joan » Mon Sep 01, 2008 5:31 pm

Top 8 Common Mistakes of New Exotic Pet Owners
By Lianne McLeod, DVM
http://exoticpets.about.com/od/generalr ... stakes.htm

Making the commitment to own any pet takes a lot of careful thought and consideration. Unfortunately, with some exotic pets it is easy to get caught in the trap of thinking they are easy to care for, or less of a commitment than dogs and cats. Some exotic pets represent an enormous commitment of time and money, so it is important to really research and prepare if you decide on an exotic pet.

1. Impulsive Adoptions: http://exoticpets.about.com/cs/resource ... ingpet.htm

When you spot an amazing, adorable creature at the pet store (or elsewhere) it is tempting to bring him or her home right away. However, resist this urge. Instead, go home and find out everything you can about this kind of pet. Then, give yourself a couple of days to decide with certainty that this is right pet for you and make sure you are not making any of the following mistakes. Also make sure you have the proper housing set up before getting the pet (see mistake number two).

2. Not Preparing a Home Before Getting a Pet

Coming home to a new environment is stressful and scary, and it will only be harder if your new pet has to stay in temporary housing while you get a cage or tank set up. Find out everything you will need, and get it all set up. Make sure temperatures and humidity are right, and when your new pet gets home, it can go directly into a proper environment. At this point, let your new pet settle in and explore its new home for a couple of days before trying to tame or handle your new pet.

3. Underestimating the Cost of Owning a Pet

You might find that some exotic pets do not cost a lot. However, you need to accurately assess the true cost including housing, equipment, and ongoing costs like food and supplies. Also do not forget to factor in veterinary care. Considering the full cost is especially important for reptiles, which are often inexpensive themselves. However, they often need large terrariums, heating, and lights (including expensive UVA/UVB lamps which must be replaced regularly).

4. Neglecting Veterinary Care:

Many people have not factored in the cost of veterinary care and may try to avoid vet visits because of the cost. Many exotic pets are experts at hiding illness until they are in serious trouble (remember, not showing weakness is a natural defense mechanism), so if your pet is showing signs of illness you are best off getting to a vet as soon as possible. Routine check ups are ideal, and it is best to have a relationship with a vet before an emergency situation arises.
More: Choosing a Vet for Exotic Pets: http://exoticpets.about.com/cs/resource ... ngavet.htm


5. Not Researching the Legal Status of Pets

I cannot emphasize enough how important this is. You risk losing your pets if you do not do your research on this one. Start locally and work up to the state/provincial level, then nationally. Do not rely on word of mouth or Internet sites (even this one!), as this is too important not to confirm in person. Sometimes the laws are outdated or unfair, but that does not help if your pet is seized. Advice on how to find out the correct information is found in the link above.
More: How To Research Exotic Pet Laws: http://exoticpets.about.com/cs/reptiles ... issues.htm

6. Rescuing a Sick or Mistreated Animal from a Pet Store

This one is really hard to avoid so is a really easy mistake to make. You might be tempted to ignore the above advice if you come across an animal in distress and feel the need to rescue it. Unfortunately, trying to rescue a sick animal may cost a lot in vet bills and emotional distress if you are unsuccessful. Additionally, the pet store, buoyed by the sale they just made, will likely just bring in more animals and treat them the same way. If at all possible, report animals in distress to your local humane society or authorities rather than taking them in yourself.

7. Not Planning Ahead

This one encompasses many of the previous points, but bears repeating. Owners need to consider how long their pet might live, and how they will cope with their pet's needs over their whole life span. This includes lining up veterinarians and pet-sitters, and being able to provide proper housing, food and care for the pet's entire life. Other things to consider what you will do with your pet during life's transitions including college, moves, marriages, and children.

8. Thinking Someone Will Take Your Pets if You Can't Care for Them

Finding a new home for an exotic pet is not as easy as many people think it will be, and the more "exotic" the pet the harder it will be. Most zoos are unwilling or unable to take former pets. Most shelters are not equipped to take exotics, and sanctuaries specifically for exotic pets are rare and often full to capacity already. Never assume that if you can't keep your pets, you will be able to find someone else to commit to caring for your exotic pets (and never just let them go, either!): http://exoticpets.about.com/cs/resource ... elease.htm
"A lot of people spend time talking to the Animals, but not that many people listen. That's the real problem! ... Winnie the Pooh

sophocles22
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Re: Top 8 Common Mistakes of Flyer Owners

Postby sophocles22 » Thu Sep 04, 2008 12:04 pm

I'm so glad you posted this. I wish this was on here before I bought my Sophocles. I love him to death and I did a LOT of research before I even considered getting him, but I was lied to at the pet store and therefore his initial reaction to me was negative. I thought I was getting a baby so I was treating him as such and he was an adult. (Not to mention I thought he was a girl for the first month he was with me because that's what the pet store told me) I put my hand in his cage the first day I brought him home and now I'm having to work really hard to get him to not be afraid of my hand in the cage. So thank you for posting this and I hope that everyone reads it!
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HOF to Sophocles!

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Re: Top 8 Common Mistakes of Flyer Owners

Postby 4tupelo » Mon Feb 23, 2009 4:56 pm

this is a great website!! Thankyou

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Re: Top 8 Common Mistakes of Flyer Owners

Postby Delight » Thu Jul 14, 2011 12:36 am

I just wanted to ad that I am a USDA licensed rescue and educational facility located in Washington state (for those of you who can no longer care for your pet) and I have the ability to take in most exotics all the way up to medium sized exotic cats (serval, lynx, bobcat etc.) I have many large squirrel/glider safe cages in storage that are 3ft wide by 5ft tall by 2ft deep. If I can't personaly take in an animal I know many other people in the pacific north west that work with exotics as well. :multi:
Owned by 5 flyers, 1 geoffroys cat, 1 african serval, 1 bengal, 1 parrot & 1 dog. www.totallytameexotics.yolasite.com

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Re: Top 8 Common Mistakes of Flyer Owners

Postby skul » Fri Dec 09, 2011 4:26 am

The biggest one is the impulse buy.
Flyers are a black hole for your soul.
If you are sucked in, you will most likely never escape.

For folks looking for information.
Flyers are not toys.
They are not a novelty.
They can, and will, live for ten or more years with proper care.
If for any reason, you don't think it possible, please do not get a flyer.

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Re: Top 8 Common Mistakes of Flyer Owners

Postby slmero » Tue Feb 18, 2014 9:12 pm

sophocles22 wrote:I'm so glad you posted this. I wish this was on here before I bought my Sophocles. I love him to death and I did a LOT of research before I even considered getting him, but I was lied to at the pet store and therefore his initial reaction to me was negative. I thought I was getting a baby so I was treating him as such and he was an adult. (Not to mention I thought he was a girl for the first month he was with me because that's what the pet store told me) I put my hand in his cage the first day I brought him home and now I'm having to work really hard to get him to not be afraid of my hand in the cage. So thank you for posting this and I hope that everyone reads it!
i know this is an old post... But Oh my God!! I am suspecting that this is exactly what happened to me with my Bella!! I got her from a place called S and S exotics and they shipped Bella to me from Texas (I live in MA) so I couldn't meet her first. They told me she was 10 weeks old but her teeth were already orange which led me to think they lied about her age. They told me she was "hand tame" but I after weeks and weeks if research, I know now that she wasn't handled much at all. When I asked for a picture, I was met with resistance at first but then did receive a picture of what they told me was my baby and she was sitting on someones hand. At first i thought, oh good she is at least used to human contact. Of course, they look quite similar so I can't be sure that's even her. I too tried too hard the night I brought Bella home by reaching right into the box she was shipped in and tried to pick her up which caused Bella to spring to life and take off into my bathroom where an hour long pursuit ensued. I feel SO stupid now for doing that because I think it seriously affected how long it will take Bella to trust me, especially since she's an adult already and I couldn't bond with her as a little baby. Ive had her for a little over 3 weeks now and even after taking her out EVERY night fr hours and wearing her in a bonding pouch every minute that im home during the day, she still wont climb into my hand. She'll take treats from me and jumps on me when we have play time but she won't climb into my hand and she hardly ever let's me pat her when she's in her cage. Although, she loves to petted outside her cage. Lastly, she bites. I have learned her habits in the last few weeks and have been able to almost break her of it but she still bites me if I try to pick her up and put her in my shirt, for example. When I read this post, I was so relieved to see that someone else had the same experience as me. And I'm sorry but no amount of research prepared me for the exhausting, expensive, AMAZING, life that comes with raising a flying squirrel!! I have dedicated my life to the care and well being of this beautiful little creature and I wouldnt have it any other way! :lover: I think i have learned more from this flying squirrel than I have from any human! LOL!! :crazy:
Momma to 3 babygirls:
Miss Bella Rose (my newest and youngest, flying squirrel)
Miss Gracie Ann (my rebellious middle child, ferret who thinks she's a dog)
Miss Foxy Lady (my first-born, dog)


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