BUYER BEWARE

Joan
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BUYER BEWARE

Postby Joan » Tue Apr 19, 2005 6:34 pm

Please note that when you post a request for a flyer on this forum and you are contacted by someone who said they saw your ad, that does NOT mean that the seller is a member of this board (we have lurkers who sell), a member of the NFSA or are endorsed by the NFSA. It is ALWAYS best to get a second opinion about an unknown seller. You can post a request for information on a particular seller and ask that you are e-mailed privately

Keep in mind that brokers who do business with wild flyer trappers or even breed commerically will often pull a pup from it's mother too early and wean incorrectly and much too early. Plus, the poor pup may be shipped from Florida or Texas (two states notorious for poaching from the wild) illegally (via FedEX, as aquarium fish, etc) to the broker/seller. This poor start in life may effect the future health and perhaps cause a shortened lifespan for the unfortunate flyer.

You are risking your money when you send full payment up front and you will have a hard time getting it back once you send it, esp. out of state. You are risking a deposit too, although there are some businesses that always require deposits to protect themselves. If a deposit is required, ask if it is refundable. If you change your mind or can't get a pup for some reason, you lose a non-refundable deposit. What guarantee comes with the pup?

As long as the seller has the required state wildlife and/or USDA permit(s) , the State Wildlife and Game Commission (or USDA) can't do anything. They have bigger fish to fry; so reporting someone to them is likely a waste of time.

Filing an Official Complaint:
It is more likely that complaints of keeping money and not refunding, etc. would be acted upon by that state's Consumer Protection Agencies and/or State Attorney General. You might have some luck with that state's animal authorities, but it would need to be researched on an individual state to state basis. Even if you are told nothing can be done, file a formal complaint and it goes on record if anyone asks about this seller. Do the same with the Better Business Bureau in the seller's area (City, County or Area of the State) as it goes on record and will warn potential buyers in the future.

Suing:
You could file a claim in small claims court in the state that has jurisdiction over this case.  The "breeder" is entitled to be sued where he lives. If you can establish that he has enough contacts in your state (like he sells a lot of animals or merchandise) you could try to file a suit there.  Your problem likely isn’t going to rise to that level and the cost of a flyer is a relatively small amount of money to get a case moved out of the "breeder's" state.

If the "breeder" took your money and didn’t give you a pup, then he breached your contract. You could write him a letter and demand your money back and threaten legal action. But, you would have to be available to get to his state for trial if it comes to that. You would have to prove the details of your arrangement and what would happen if he didn’t have any pups available.  You can do this without a lawyer, but you would need to be able to get to his state for the case, which might not be realistic depending on your circumstances.
"A lot of people spend time talking to the Animals, but not that many people listen. That's the real problem! ... Winnie the Pooh

Joan
Site Admin
Posts: 9060
Joined: Mon Aug 09, 2004 3:30 pm
nobotspam: No
How many feet does a squirrel have?: 4
Location: Fleming Island, FL
Contact:

Re: BUYER BEWARE

Postby Joan » Mon Jun 09, 2008 5:01 pm

Exotic Animal Brokers

Dr. Cooley and I have been corresponding recently about unusual infections in flyers. Below is an edited version of some of his thoughts on the subject and exotic brokers. Yet another reason not to use them, in my opinion.

" In 2003, monkeypox was reported in several people in Wisconsin and was traced back to prairie dogs that had been placed into contact with exotic rodents that were imported into the United States from West Africa.  I do not imagine that anyone previously thought that prairie dogs would have been susceptible to monkeypox prior to this outbreak.  You could always ask yourself what is the chance of a prairie dog from the United States coming into contact with a Zambian rat.  However, it certainly happened and the consequences were severe for the victims.  The
response of public health officials was to ban any further keeping of prairie dogs as pets.

You will notice that the doctor who wrote the CDC report jumped to the immediate conclusion that exotic pets represent a substantial hazard. This is a typical exaggeration. We both know that millions of exotic pets are owned by people and if they were dying by the truckload, it would probably hit the news.  The authors reference the prairie dog incident has a similar scenario. 

The story regarding exotic animal dealers is the real substantial hazard. The reality is that exotic animal dealers often co-mingle species, often from different continents.  This is the nature of their business.  I also suspect that the level of sanitation in some facilities is poor and the possibility of contamination of food or water from other animals is likely high. "
"A lot of people spend time talking to the Animals, but not that many people listen. That's the real problem! ... Winnie the Pooh


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